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Best DNA Ancestry Test 2017: 23andMe vs Ancestry vs FTDNA vs Geno 2.0

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1st
Family Tree DNA logo
2nd
Ancestry DNA logo
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23andMe logo

Who are you? Where did your ancestors come from? Do you have relatives that you never knew existed? These are some of life’s biggest mysteries, and thanks to scientific breakthroughs over the last few years, you can now fill in more of your ancestry puzzle than ever before. Yes, we’re talking about the magic of DNA testing, which has added an exciting element to tracing your family’s roots. How? Through a home DNA test that you can order online, easily administer yourself and send in to get your individual genealogy DNA tested. Here, we examine just what these at home DNA tests involve, the kind of information you can learn, and which is the best DNA ancestry test for your personal needs.

What Exactly is a DNA Ancestry Test?

When you order a home DNA ancestry test, typically you’ll get either a cheek swab or saliva test, which are both easy to follow and submit to the lab (they give you a sample container in each kit). What’s more important than how you administer the test is the part of your DNA that’s being examined by the lab. Each service we review here offers something a little different. Here’s a breakdown of the three types of genealogy DNA testing.

Autosomal DNA Testing

The main focus of autosomal DNA testing is to find matches with other individuals based on a certain amount of shared DNA. Testing can’t predict exact relationships, but you can expect to find matches as far out as 5th cousins and in some cases even further. Sites like AncestryDNA analyze shared DNA and give you your matches as well as how much DNA you have in common.

Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) Testing

mtDNA tests both males and females along their direct maternal line, examining genetic markers on your mtDNA, which is passed down from mother to child each generation. This testing reveals your direct maternal deep ancestry and which haplogroup you belong to. All humans descend from Mitochondrial Eve, who lived an estimated 200,000 years ago in Africa. Her descendants are organized into different branches called haplogroups. mtDNA test results predict your mtDNA haplogroup.

Y Chromosome DNA (Y-DNA) Testing

Only males can take a Y-DNA test (you might recall from biology class that women don’t have a Y-chromosome). The Y-DNA test traces direct male-line ancestry — the majority of the Y-chromosome is transmitted from father to son with very little change. Each male’s Y-DNA test results are compared to other males’ results to find out their most recent common ancestor (MRCA) in their direct patrilineal lines. Most testing companies will provide this information. While females can’t be Y-DNA tested, you can have your brother, father, paternal grandfather, paternal uncle or paternal uncle’s son (your cousin) take a test for you.

Benefit of mtDNA and Y-DNA Testing

You can do a deep dive into your ancestors (we’re talking thousands of years back), which you can’t do with Autosomal DNA testing. All services we review here include DNA testing for ethnicity, so you can get a clearer picture of where in the world your ancestors originated. The world is separated into about 25 different regions, and you’ll get an approximate percentage of your inherited DNA from each region.

Best DNA Ancestry Test Winners

We chose our best DNA ancestry test winners for 2017 based on a number of factors, including: the types of tests they offer, DNA database size, the extent of ancestry information you can find from each test, cost, genealogy research tools and more. And now, on to our genetic testing reviews!

Family Tree DNA Review

#1

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Family Tree DNA (FTDNA) is the clear winner of best DNA ancestry test if you’re committed to serious genealogy research or if you want to learn as much as possible from your DNA testing. Family Tree DNA is the only service that offers all three types of test: Autosomal, Y-DNA and mtDNA testing, and the test is a simple cheek swab. They also give you the ability to transfer your data from other services and store your results for 25 years. You get the email addresses of your matches and can join targeted genealogical projects within their network. What’s missing? Although not related to ancestry, you don’t get medical-specific DNA results, like with 23andMe. But if your focus is on your family roots, FTDNA is the best way to go.

Pros

Cons

  • Competitive pricing for DNA Autosomal test
  • Only site to offer Autosomal DNA, Y-DNA and mtDNA testing kits and a good variety of bundled packages
  • Website supports targeted DNA genealogical projects
  • Stores your DNA sample for 25 years
  • Provides trusted privacy for your test sample
  • You receive email addresses for your genetic matches
  • Chromosome browser tool to compare shared chromosomal segments
  • Allows uploading of raw DNA results from 23andMe, Ancestry DNA and Geno 2.0
  • Excellent online community forums and customer service
  • Provides biogeographical ancestry analysis
  • Database (844,000+ people) isn’t quite as extensive as other services
  • Doesn’t offer health-related DNA testing

Pricing

FTDNA offers several bundled packages in addition to the pricing below.

  • $79 Family Finder Autosomal DNA Kit (cheek swab)
  • $79 mtDNA Plus DNA Kit
  • $199 mtDNA Full Sequence Kit
  • $169 Y37 Markers
  • $268 Y67 Markers
  • $359 Y111 Markers
  • $12.95 shipping

Coupon Code

Family Tree DNA often has time sensitive coupons, find and share them here!

Read our in-depth FamilyTreeDNA Review

Ancestry DNA Review

#2

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AncestryDNA, part of the wildly popular genealogical site Ancestry.com, is our number two pick for best DNA ancestry test. The company offers affordable pricing, an extremely active online community, extensive DNA ancestry database and access to millions of family trees and billions of historical records via the Ancestry website. They analyze your simple saliva test at more than 700,000 genetic markers to find your genetic matches and give you a breakdown of your ethnicity. AncestryDNA suspended its Y-DNA and mtDNA testing, however, so you don’t have the ability to drill down as deep into your genetic profile and ancestry as you can with FTDNA, which still offers those tests.

Pros

Cons

  • Competitive pricing for Autosomal DNA test
  • Largest database — 2 million people
  • Reliable security for DNA test samples and results
  • Excellent online community forums and customer service
  • Provides biogeographical ancestry analysis
  • Stores your DNA sample indefinitely
  • Can connect with genetic matches via anonymous email and Ancestry.com message boards
  • Doesn’t offer separate Y-DNA or mtDNA testing
  • No targeted genealogical DNA projects available to join on website
  • Can’t upload raw DNA data from other services
  • No chromosome browser available to compare shared chromosomal segments
  • Doesn’t offer health-related DNA tests

Pricing

  • $99 DNA testing kit (saliva sample)
  • $9.95 shipping
  • Results available in 6-8 weeks

Coupon

AncestryDNA often has time sensitive coupons, find and share them here!

Read our in-depth AncestryDNA Review

23andMe Review

#3

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23andMe comes in third as our best ancestry DNA testing company for the unique services they provide. 23andMe is your best bet if you want to trace your lineage and get health-related DNA results. They offer two testing kit types — an Autosomal Ancestry test for $99 or a Health + Ancestry test for $199. On the ancestry side, you’ll get three reports: ethnic composition, haplogroups and Neanderthal ancestry. 23andMe’s health results include 35 carrier status reports (whether you carry genes for certain health conditions), five wellness reports (lactose intolerance, for example), and more than a dozen trait reports (male bald spot, unibrow, etc.). If you want to use your DNA results to help you trace your family tree, however, 23andMe’s research tools and genealogy community aren’t up to par with FamilyTreeDNA or Ancestry.com.

Pros

Cons

  • Large database of 1 million people
  • Offers some health-related DNA test results
  • Test samples and results are secure for privacy
  • Provides chromosome browser to compare shared chromosomal segments
  • Provides biogeographical ancestry analysis
  • Stores your DNA sample
  • DNA autosomal test more expensive than our top two winners
  • Doesn’t offer Y-DNA or mtDNA testing
  • No genealogical DNA projects available to join on website
  • Can’t upload raw DNA data from other services
  • Genealogical community forums are lacking compared to our top two choices
  • Harder to connect with genetic matches (they must approve sharing contact information, and members say many don’t)

Pricing

  • $99 Ancestry DNA test (saliva sample)
  • $199 Ancestry + Health DNA testing kit
  • $9.95 shipping via 23andMe website
  • Results available in 6-8 weeks

Coupon

23andMe occasionally has time sensitive coupons, find and share them here!

What Other DNA Ancestry Tests Should You Consider?

Below are some other DNA tests we’ve reviewed for you to consider.

Living DNA | MyHeritage DNA | National Geographic Geno 2.0

Living DNA Review

Living DNA logo

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Living DNA, an England-based company that launched in early 2015, is a new addition to our reviews this year. They say they’re the “first truly global DNA test” because they break down ancestral origins across 80 worldwide regions (while other companies focus on an estimated 30 regions). Furthermore, they break down your roots across 21 regions in the British Isles. If you already have a good idea that your roots are from the United Kingdom, Living DNA could be a great test for you to delve deeper into the region. Living DNA has partnered with several leading genomics, analytical, testing and research organizations, which lends them a lot of credit in our book. We’re keeping our eye on this relative newcomer to see how their reputation plays out.

Pros

Cons

  • Provides the widest geographical breakdown of your ethnicity of any at-home DNA test on the market
  • Excellent for a more in-depth British regional breakdown
  • Gives you raw data results, which you can upload to several free genealogy research websites
  • Good security and privacy policy
  • Expensive
  • Doesn’t have its own database, so you can’t compare your results to others who’ve tested or find familial matches
  • No health-related DNA results
  • No genealogy research website resources, tools or community
  • No information on website about long-term DNA sample storage

Pricing

  • $159 DNA testing kit
  • Free shipping
  • Results in 10-12 weeks

MyHeritage DNA Review

MyHeritage DNA logo

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MyHeritage is one of the most popular genealogy research and family tree websites in the world. In September 2016, they launched an autosomal DNA ancestry test at a competitive price. Their test is similar to AncestryDNA, with slightly fewer ethnic regions identified. But MyHeritage has plans to expand their testing to 100 regions in the coming years. Although the test is new, their testing lab holds top certification and accreditation from leading organizations. An advantage of MyHeritage DNA? You can import DNA testing results from competing companies to compare with their database. The downside? While they have a massive database of family trees and active users, their database of DNA results is still in its early stages. But based on the popularity of this website, we anticipate their DNA database will grow quickly.

Pros

Cons

  • Competitive pricing for Autosomal DNA test
  • Reliable security for DNA test samples and results
  • Provides biogeographical ancestry analysis
  • Can upload raw DNA data from other services
  • Good online community forums and customer service
  • No separate Y-DNA or mtDNA testing
  • Doesn’t offer targeted genealogical DNA projects available to join on website
  • DNA testing database too small (for now)
  • Doesn’t provide health-related DNA test
  • No information on website about long-term DNA sample storage

Pricing

  • $79 Autosomal DNA testing kit (cheek swab)
  • $10 shipping
  • Results in 3-4 weeks

National Geographic Geno 2.0 Review

National Geographic Genoproject logo

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The Geno 2.0 Next Generation DNA testing kit is best for people who want to trace their roots all the way back to ancient origins (even to Neanderthals). The test is part of the National Geographic Genographic Project, a scientific effort to analyze historic patterns in human DNA across the globe. How does it work? You purchase and submit your simple cheek swab test, their lab runs its newest advanced DNA testing, which identifies thousands of mtDNA markers for direct maternal lineage, examines Y-DNA markers for direct paternal ancestry and analyzes more than 750,000 other ancestry-informative markers to reveal your ancestry’s regional affiliations. The Geno 2.0 Next Gen test is expensive, and their database is relatively small which limits your research abilities. But the great thing about this test is that FTDNA allows you to upload your Geno 2.0 results into their database for free, so you can find your relatives and get additional insight on your ancestral origins. And you get the satisfaction of knowing that you’re contributing to a global historical genomic project.

Pros

Cons

  • Offers autosomal and full mtDNA testing (but limited Y-DNA)
  • Test samples saved securely for privacy
  • Contributing to a globally targeted genealogical DNA project
  • Excellent online community forums and customer service
  • Provides biogeographical ancestry analysis
  • DNA test is expensive
  • Smaller database at 800,000 (but you can upload to FTDNA)
  • Can’t upload raw DNA data from other services
  • No chromosome browser
  • No website support for connecting with genetic matches

Pricing

  • $149.95 DNA testing kit (cheek swab)
  • Free shipping
  • Results available in 8-10 weeks

You Never Know What You’ll Discover

Watch this heartwarming story from the Katie Couric Show about what one man discovered from his AncestryDNA test.

Is Your DNA Ancestry Sample Protected?

Yes. The testing services reviewed here all have strict privacy policies in place to protect your DNA sample from being misused — you can find these policies on their websites. And in 2008, the U.S. passed the Genetic Information and Non-Discrimination Act to protect citizens from having their genetic information used against them for health insurance or employment purposes.

A Big Piece of Our Collective Human History

Whether you’re searching for living relatives or want to know where your ancestors originated from, a DNA ancestry test is a fun way to find out more about what made you who you are. With nearly three million genetic ancestry profiles conducted since genetic genealogy became commercially available in 2000 and a growing interest in DNA ancestry, we can all learn more about our shared human evolution. If you’re not already researching genealogy online, you may want to check out our Best Online Genealogy Software comparison article for our recommendations.

What do you hope to discover about your relatives and genetic makeup through DNA testing?

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.

An international traveler since she was under 10 years old, Sally loves exploring the world’s mysteries first hand. Her favorite destinations? Greece and the British Virgin Islands. She grew up learning to question, explore, and discover new things and ideas — it’s probably why she went into journalism as a career! She loves what the Internet has brought to research and exploration, but she still hits the ground to travel whenever she gets the chance.

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283 Comments on "Best DNA Ancestry Test 2017: 23andMe vs Ancestry vs FTDNA vs Geno 2.0"

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laia
laia

Hello! I’m from Spain although many many times in my life people had asked me if I got asian family (which I don’t know so far). I was wondering if a simple Family Finder Autosomal would be enough (and which company is the best) or if I need the mtDNA (and which company is the best). I’d really would like to know more about my ethnicity (if I have a part from caucasian) and as close as the country were comes from if it’s possible. Thanks so so much.

Tam

Hello Sally Jones- I just ordered the 23andMe test because I know my mother’s(deceased) history but my father is estranged. He says that he’s Indian but I have never seen him. I have a son, should I get my son to take the Y-DNA test to find out more about my father? I have no one else to find out information on my biological father.

Also, I’m wondering if I ordered the correct test? I have an Ancestry membership(family tree) account. Can I link/uploade my 23andMe results to find living relatives in Ancestry.com?

Thanks in advance.

Deborah Schmidt
Deborah Schmidt
Hi Sally, I recently returned from Budapest and am planning to pursue my family’s history and possible lost relatives. My focus is two-fold: First, to discover from where members of my mother’s side of the family originated (a guide suggested that many Hungarians originated in Mongolia) and second, to discover any far-flung relatives. Most of the family of my grandmother’s generation died in the Holocaust (she was one of the few to emigrate before the war) but I’d love to know if anyone in her extended family survived. I would like to start with one DNA ancestry test and then… Read more »
Unityman
Unityman

I just received my National Geographic Geno 2.0 (Helix) results, which includes ancestry by region. Does the Ancestry.com test provide sufficiently more regional detail to be worth a second test?

bluejay
bluejay

Hello,
I am interested in a test that gives me the most complete view of my geographical origins as far back as possible, including possble Neanderthal. I am female, does this give me a disadvantage?

Martha
Martha

Hi, I am 9th generation American, and I can trace most of that back myself, but I want to know what was Before that. Can I find out about ancestry through, say, 2000 years? Thanks!

Canadian Cousin
Canadian Cousin
Hi Sally, Although I’ve been researching my family history for approximately 20 years, I’ve only just ordered my first DNA test. I decided to go with Living DNA and was surprised to see that you called their test expensive – while US$159 might be costly for autosomal DNA testing, the fact that they include mitochondrial and Y-chromosome DNA tests in the same package makes it something of a bargain, in my opinion. Were you just referring to the fact that the initial cost is higher than their competitors, or do you think that the additional tests aren’t quite the deal… Read more »
joyce Adams (Furczyk)
joyce Adams (Furczyk)

Which test will give you both mother and father ancestors, will you be able to trace each separately?

MrBoraxo
MrBoraxo

Which test provides the best breakdown by country? I’m a mixed breed and would like to know exactly what % is German, Russian, Portuguese, Polish, etc. I really don’t care about tracing my path from Africa, which is gonna be that same for most Europeans.

Judy
Judy

I am interested in doing this for health reasons for my husband. Which test would give me the best of both worlds?

ann

I’ve heard there is some sort of commonality with around 16 million people alive today that can all be traced to one man in central Asia (maybe Genghis Khan, though no way to know as no genetic information on him). Is there a test that would show if I have this relationship? Thanks!

Michelle
Michelle

Hi I was wondering what test would be best to find out about health, like what kind of things I could get and pass down to my kids ?? Thank u

Jill
Jill
Hello Sally. I am adopted and am on a search to find my biological family. I took the AncestryDNA test and discovered a possible 1/2 sister who was also adopted. Beyond this DNA test, neither of us have any information about our biological families. We both have uploaded our DNA into myHeritage, GEDmatch, and FTDNA. By doing this, I have found a potential 2nd cousin that we both share. We are considering taking another DNA test just to be sure. What would you recommend. The potenital 2nd cousin took her test through 23andMe. Thanks for any help or advise you… Read more »
Sue Page
Sue Page

Hi Sally. My adopted son does not know what his background heritage is. His biological parents had big issues and we aren’t really looking for relationships but want to know about ” what” he is.. as he is asked and obviously bi or multiracial. What test would be best for ethnic background and do you have the right to NOT include your information to be contacted by possible other family members.

Carl
Carl

OK. Y markers. I gpot those 15 years ago from Gnome. BUT, no one ever explained the significance of the markers, other than they somehow represented mutations?
.

Carl
Carl
I had National Geographic perform Y and MtDNA tests done about 15 years ago. The product is basically a Haplogroup for Y and a Haplogroup for MtDna. Punching these into Google, shows the current distribution of those Haplogroups. I do not really see 23 and Me or Ancestry or FTDNA providing anymore info other than comparing with their respective data bases. . Am I missing something? One disappointment in Genographics is that there is/was no one to talk to RE the meaning of the test data. ALSO, IF A full sequence is done, is there a company that can interpret… Read more »
wolf
wolf
i had it verified today by support from one of the top 10 testing groups, that in fact, all raw files from all competitors contain similar data incl mutations aka ‘health’ even if they dont offer any tests on their sites to read/decode/report any of it, so the truth is ‘all raw files have mutation/health data’ embedded in them and you can take any of them over to 3rd party reporting sites to unpack that data. please add ‘gene by gene’ to an updated comparison, they are $79. presales support at familytree and gene by gene are very responsive which… Read more »
wolf
wolf

“Doesn’t offer health-related DNA tests” sounds like FDA-legalese aka a misnomer, all these raw files must contain the same data that when uploaded to 3rd parties reveal health information if that site is equipped to decode the raw file and has reports to show the health data.

Cybele Moon
Cybele Moon
Hi Sally – oh boy my results from Family tree vs Ancestry differed wildly!! with a low confidence of 2% “Caucasus” in Ancestry I got 24% “middle Eastern” in FTdna. FTdna : Ancestry British Isles 30% British Isles 21%, Ireland 12% Western & Central Europe 46% Western Europe 14% Middle East- 24% Italian/Greek 48% Scandinavia 2% Caucasus 2% Ancestry says I am 98% European where FTdna say 76% European. I have yet to do 23&me. But not sure anymore of the accuracy. So very strange. But I do know Scots and Irish in family and also Southern Italy on father’s… Read more »
Carl
Carl

Moon. That is my concern..All companies have the same data with differing results…… AND each has its own data base. I wonder if there is an organization that keeps a master data base. If I bought a product from each of the providers, even if they were close in analysis, I’m not sure I would get any more information than one of them …

Nancy
Nancy

Hi Sue, what test would you recommend I take if I want to learn more about what indigenous group I come from? My parents are from Mexico State and I would love to learn the specific tribe I come from. Are there any tests that are more specific for Mexico’s indigenous groups? Thank you in advance for your help.

Brian Tomasio
Brian Tomasio

Hi Nancy, for what its worth, i found this company provides just what you are looking for! http://www.accu-metrics.com/first-nation.php Good luck!

Sue

Hi Sally, my grandmother has been traced back to 1600’s in U.S. What should I use to trace her roots which may be English. Thanks for taking the time to answer these questions ~ Sue

Gerardo
Gerardo

Hi! Sally I got my results from AncestryDNA and from my hermitage both are different. Ancestry :62 % Native American, 25% Iberian peninsula. My Hermitage: 90% Native American, 7 % North and west Europe. To me is look to different why?

Kaitlyn Johns
Kaitlyn Johns

Hi Sally. I’m looking for which test would be best for my mother. We don’t really care about finding relatives or anything like that, we are more interested in knowing what parts of the world her ancestors are from. Her family has been in America since the early 1600’s, but it has also migrated with nearly every generation, married in a lot of different people, and had minimal formal education so we’ve never had many clues to go on. Which tests are going to give us the most comprehensive information about where she is from? Thanks.

Jessica
Jessica
Hi Sally, I am adopted and know very little of my family history. I do know that both my parents were French Canadians and so I assume that my roots could be traced back to France. Beyond that I don’t know much else. I’m also interested in any information about RH- blood type. Both my parents passed away (I did get to connect with my dad and some siblings). I only have 2 brothers (only can locate 1 of them) as I would like to know my dad’s genetic history. Which test would you recommend I take?
Sue Williams
Sue Williams

Hi, I’ve tested my elderly parents with 23andMe and am considering other companies for them. I understand that it would be good to test a maternal uncle. Would there be any need to test siblings for ancestry since I have tested my parents? Thanks.

Cynthia
Cynthia

Hi Sally, I have read your article and looked through the different websites but wanted to ask your advice. My dad passed and I have two full brothers and one half brother. I am interested in getting info on both health and ancestry and possible relatives. Would you suggest I do 23andMe first then upload the raw data to another source? What would you do to get the most info without having to pay for all the various options? Thanks!

Tony
Tony
Hi Sally, I tried to look through prior comments to see if a similar question, but to my knowledge, I don’t see one. I was wondering which kit you would recommend for my parents and myself. We moved to the US from Egypt when I was a toddler and as far as have known the vast majority of our ancestors were Egyptian. I believe we have some Moroccan on my Father’s side and Turkish on my Mother’s. But being from that region, I’m concerned that the results might be too vague/inconclusive. I saw a couple of question from people asking… Read more »
Ondina
Ondina

You should add TellMeGen to your comparison: http://www.tellmegen.com/

I think your PROS and CONS are only based in FTDNA options. There are a lot of things you doesn’t said.

Tammy
Tammy

We never knew the identity of my grandfather’s father, and we were unable to obtain my father’s DNA before he passed. If I do an Autosomal DNA test would that help me trace possible ancestors on my father’s/grandfather’s side of the family? If so what service do you recommend? Is there a company who can do DNA testing on personal items?

Jan

I ‘m pretty use I’m at a dead end as my father was an only son and I have two sisters. So there is no hope of tracking my “y” connection. I’m 75 years old.

Cathie
Cathie

Hi Sally, Any recommendations on best test for identifying African roots? The ultimate goal is know what African region my family comes from and then visit. Also, father’s family has been in the US for generations and mother’s family from the Caribbean. Thank you!

Oliver
Oliver

Not sure if someone else mentioned, but I believe 23andMe does include the Y-DNA and MtDNA testing, as I received both Paternal and Maternal Haplogroup information from the testing. After all, it wouldn’t be 23 chromosomes if it wasn’t included.

Rachel
Rachel

In order to maximize the amount of information that can be gathered from DNA testing but also have a larger comparative database, can a brother be tested through one company in order to do the Y-DNA, and then a female sibling tested via another company? If so, can you make a recommendation? Or is it recommended to stay within one company?

Liz Tipps
Liz Tipps

I have taken the Ancestry DNA test and it shows I am 78% Great Britain and 9% Scandinavian. Would your tests go back further or pinpoint more exact ancestry? I’m interested in what regions we come from and also how far I can go back in the past with where I came from

Kevin
Kevin

If I am simply looking for genealogical information (my family has been in the US for over 200 years), which test/company would you recommend? Supposedly, the lineage dates back to England, Ireland, Scotland, France, and Germany… true “mutt”.

Nick
Nick

Hey Sally, thanks for doing the comparisons and still answering people who have questions and concerns!

I’m Asian (Taiwanese, with family coming from China) and I was wondering which test is best for myself? I was also curious about my health, but heard 23andme isn’t the way it used to be after the FDA cracked down on them and the best way to go is just with Ancestry or FTDNA and upload the results on Promethease for a small fee.

What are your recommendations for my situation? Thanks again for all that you do!

Shea
Shea

Hi Sally, I would like to ask what test you think would be best for me, at least to start with. I would like to find out a more definitive area my ancestors came from in Europe plus the migration pattern to US. Do any test narrow the search enough to a precise region say in the UK which is where I think were from? Not really worried about the medical part of DNA testing. Also do the test show mothers side fathers side DNA branch seperate or would they have to be tested themselves? Thanks

Annie
Annie

My brother recently took the autosomal test with Ancestry DNA. I am interested in taking the mitDNA with another company but am uncertain about taking the autosomal test. We have the same parents so would not our autosomal results be the same?

Krystal Leigh Nicht
Krystal Leigh Nicht

This review states that 23&Me doesn’t offer mitochondrial or Y chromosome analysis…but I think that they do. It clearly states on their website that they use mitochondrial DNA and the Y chromosome to determine the haplogroup.

Josh
Josh

My wife is adopted, dark hair, brown eyes and olivish skin about 30 years old and although she doesn’t care to make any connections with biological “matches” she would like to have an idea of ethnic/country/region origin, as much as possible anyway and if possible any medical predisposed type of information. Do you have any recommendations or direction on this?

Claudia
Claudia
Hello Sally, I have always wondered whether I have Jewish ancestry since both my grandparents had black hair, but also due to their Sir names which I found in the Ashkenazi Jewish sir name list. I wouldn’t have to go back more than 4 or 5 generations, because during WWII my grandfather who was German had to, like all other citizens of Germany, prove on hand of genealogical research, that he and my grndmother had no Jewish ancestry. From memory I believe he had to go back quite a few generations. I still feel that there might have been Jewish… Read more »
Laure
Laure

I know who my mother is, but she won’t tell me who my father was, she claims to have been raped by a few different men. I don’t mean to sound cold but she has lied before so I’m not sure if this is the truth.
My hope is to find my father, which test would be best to achieve this ?

Thomas
Thomas
Hi Sally, my son, who is about to turn 16 has asked for one of these test for his birthday. He is mostly interested in finding out what countries / regions of the world his ancestors are from. Not sure which test to get for him, which one has the most “bang for my buck”. As a side note, my father was from Germany, my mother is French, and after they got married, they moved to Ecuador, which is where I was born and raised. Now I live in the U.S., which is where my wife is from. In other… Read more »
Anastasia
Anastasia

hi i am looking to find the right test to take and must say im both excited and a little frazzled. my husband and i both want to take one, to learn mostly what makes us up, but things like health would be cool too! something that was brought to my attention was that most ancestry tests dont include native americans? i know im in part, meti, and would like too see where that lays in the map of my genetic history. can you point me in the best direction please?

Sara
Sara

Why is this a “con”?
-Harder to connect with genetic matches (they must approve sharing contact information, and members say many don’t)
I see it as a “pro” because it means I can make my own decision about whether to connect with others!

T.S.
T.S.

You could create a generic free email account specifically for this.

Linda
Linda

My husband and me want to learn who we are and where we are from.We have five sons, but no living parents. My husbands paternal grandfather was 100% Irish,and his paternal grandmother was 100% Portuguese and on his mother’s side,they are Swiss. My family is a little bit of everything (?).What is the best test for us to take? We each have a sibling, but are unwilling to get tested. We want the best results to share with our children, grandchildren and great grandchild.

Tina
Tina

Hi. My sister’s and I want to get a DNA test for our father. We are looking for roots of both his mother and his father. Possibly looking for current relative but really looking for what nationalities my Grandma was and if my Grandfather was full Italian. The Family Tree seems really expensive to look at both sides. Could we get the same information from National Geographic? What test do you recommend to look at both sides of the family?

Tina
Tina
I grew up believing I was 100% Greek as far as everybody on my mother’s and father’s side of my family was concerned. I just got my results back from Ancestry.com. My results indicated that my ethnic makeup was 63% Italy/Greece. Fortunately I already knew that I was Greek because I would be wondering which ethnicity I am Italian or Greek? 14% of my ethnicity estimate comes from the Caucasus region which includes Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia,Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Turkey. I want to know which of these countries in particular my ancestors might be from. Are there any other DNA… Read more »
Ramona Hayes
Ramona Hayes

I’d like to do a test for my husband. We know his mother’s family history, but have no idea about his father’s. Which test would be best to find out his paternal line?

Elisabet Orning
Elisabet Orning

I bought a kit from the Genographic National Geographic several years ago but have never got anything except for a written overview of how migrations moves long ago. As for my personal data they have never been able to upplogad them! It’s an “ongoing issue”. I have asked them to compensate me by giving me another test to try out, free of charge, but have not even got a reply from them.
So I recommend that you try one if the other companies.

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