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Best DNA Ancestry Test 2017: 23andMe vs Ancestry vs FTDNA vs Geno 2.0

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Family Tree DNA logo
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Ancestry DNA logo
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National Geographic Genoproject logo

Who are you? Where did your ancestors come from? Do you have relatives that you never knew about? These are some of life’s biggest mysteries, and thanks to scientific breakthroughs over the last few years, you can now fill in more of your ancestry puzzle than ever before. Yes, we’re talking about the magic of DNA testing, which has added an exciting element to tracing your family’s roots. How? Through a home DNA test that you can order online, easily administer yourself and send in to get your individual genealogy DNA tested. Here, we examine just what these at home DNA tests involve, the kind of information you can learn, and which is the best DNA ancestry test for your personal needs.

What Exactly is a DNA Ancestry Test?

When you order a home DNA ancestry test, typically you’ll get either a cheek swab or saliva test, which are both easy to follow and submit to the lab (they give you a sample container in each kit). What’s more important than how you administer the test is the part of your DNA that’s being examined by the lab. Each service we review here offers something a little different. Here’s a breakdown of the three types of genealogy DNA testing.

Autosomal DNA Testing

The main focus of autosomal DNA testing is to find matches with other individuals based on a certain amount of shared DNA. Testing can’t predict exact relationships, but you can expect to find matches as far out as 5th cousins and in some cases even further. Sites like AncestryDNA analyze shared DNA and give you your matches as well as how much DNA you have in common.

Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) Testing

mtDNA tests both males and females along their direct maternal line, examining genetic markers on your mtDNA, which is passed down from mother to child each generation. This testing reveals your direct maternal deep ancestry and which haplogroup you belong to. All humans descend from Mitochondrial Eve, who lived an estimated 200,000 years ago in Africa. Her descendants are organized into different branches called haplogroups. mtDNA test results predict your mtDNA haplogroup.

Y Chromosome DNA (Y-DNA) Testing

Only males can take a Y-DNA test (you might recall from biology class that women don’t have a Y-chromosome). The Y-DNA test traces direct male-line ancestry — the majority of the Y-chromosome is transmitted from father to son with very little change. Each male’s Y-DNA test results are compared to other males’ results to find out their most recent common ancestor (MRCA) in their direct patrilineal lines. Most testing companies will provide this information. While females can’t be Y-DNA tested, you can have your brother, father, paternal grandfather, paternal uncle or paternal uncle’s son (your cousin) take a test for you.

Benefit of mtDNA and Y-DNA Testing

You can do a deep dive into your ancestors (we’re talking thousands of years back), which you can’t do with Autosomnal DNA testing. All services we review here include DNA testing for ethnicity, so you can get a clearer picture of where in the world your ancestors came from. The world is separated into about 25 different regions, and you’ll get an approximate percentage of your inherited DNA from each region.

Best DNA Ancestry Test Winners

We chose our best DNA ancestry test winners for 2017 based on a number of factors, including: the types of tests they offer, how many people are included in each site’s DNA database, the extent of ancestry information you can find from each test, cost, availability of online community forms, ability to contact genetic matches, customer support and genealogy resources on each website. And now, on to our genetic testing reviews!

Family Tree DNA Review

#1

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Family Tree DNA (FTDNA) is the clear winner of best DNA ancestry test if you’re committed to serious genealogy research or if you want to learn as much as possible from your DNA testing. Family Tree DNA is the only service that offers all three types of test: Autosomal, Y-DNA and mtDNA testing, and the test is a simple cheek swab. They also give you the ability to transfer your data from other services and store your results for 25 years. You get the email addresses of your matches and are able to join targeted genealogical projects within their network. What’s missing? Although not related to ancestry, you don’t get medical-specific DNA results, like with 23andMe. But if your focus is on your family roots, FTDNA is the best way to go.

Pros

Cons

  • Competitive pricing for DNA Autosomnal test
  • Only site to offer Autosomal DNA, Y-DNA and mtDNA testing kits and a good variety of bundled packages
  • Website supports targeted DNA genealogical projects
  • Stores your DNA sample for 25 years
  • Provides trusted privacy for your test sample
  • You receive email addresses for your genetic matches
  • Chromosome browser tool to compare shared chromosomal segments
  • Allows uploading of raw DNA results from 23andMe, Ancestry DNA and Geno 2.0
  • Excellent online community forums and customer service
  • Provides biogeographical ancestry analysis
  • Database (766,000+ people) isn’t quite as large as other services

Pricing

  • $99 Family Finder Autosomnal DNA Kit (cheek swab)
  • $69 mtDNA Plus DNA Kit
  • $199 mtDNA Full Sequence Kit
  • $169 Y37 Markers
  • $268 Y67 Markers
  • $359 Y111 Markers
  • $9.95 shipping

Coupon Code

Family Tree DNA often has time sensitive coupons, find and share them here!

Read our in-depth FamilyTreeDNA Review

Ancestry DNA Review

#2

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AncestryDNA, part of the wildly popular genealogical site Ancestry.com, is our number two pick for best DNA ancestry test. The company offers affordable pricing, an extremely active online community, large DNA ancestry database and access to millions of family trees and billions of historic records via the Ancestry website. They analyze your simple saliva test at more than 700,000 genetic markers to find your genetic matches and give you a breakdown of your ethnicity. AncestryDNA suspended its Y-DNA and mtDNA testing, however, so you don’t have the ability to drill down as deep into your genetic profile and ancestry as you can with FTDNA, which still offers those tests.

Pros

Cons

  • Competitive pricing for Autosomnal DNA test
  • Largest database — 1.4 million people
  • Reliable security for DNA test samples and results
  • Excellent online community forums and customer service
  • Provides biogeographical ancestry analysis
  • Stores your DNA sample indefinitely
  • Can connect with genetic matches via anonymous email and Ancestry.com message boards
  • Doesn’t offer separate Y-DNA or mtDNA testing
  • No targeted genealogical DNA projects available to join on website
  • Can’t upload raw DNA data from other services
  • No chromosome browser available to compare shared chromosomal segments

Pricing

  • $99 DNA testing kit (saliva sample)
  • $9.95 shipping
  • Results available in 6-8 weeks

Coupon

AncestryDNA often has time sensitive coupons, find and share them here!

Read our in-depth AncestryDNA Review

National Geographic Geno 2.0 Review

#3

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The Geno 2.0 Next Generation comes in third as our choice for best DNA ancestry test. The test is part of the National Geographic Genographic Project, a scientific effort to analyze historic patterns in human DNA across the globe. How does it work? You purchase and submit your simple cheek swab test, their lab runs its newest advanced DNA testing, which identifies thousands of mtDNA markers for direct maternal lineage, examines Y-DNA markers for direct paternal ancestry and analyzes more than 750,000 other ancestry-informative markers to reveal your ancestry’s regional affiliations. The Geno 2.0 Next Gen test is expensive, and their database is relatively small which limits your research abilities. But the great thing about this test is that FTDNA allows you to upload your Geno 2.0 results into their database for free, so you can find your relatives and get additional insight on your ancestral origins. And you get the satisfaction of knowing that you’re contributing to a global historic genomic project. You can even learn if you have Neanderthal DNA in your genome — pretty cool, huh?!

Pros

Cons

  • Offers autosomnal and full mtDNA testing (but limited Y-DNA)
  • Test samples saved securely for privacy
  • Contributing to a globally targeted genealogical DNA project
  • Excellent online community forums and customer service
  • Provides biogeographical ancestry analysis
  • DNA test is expensive
  • Much smaller database at 200,000 (but you can upload to FTDNA)
  • Can’t upload raw DNA data from other services
  • No chromosome browser
  • No website support for connecting with genetic matches

Pricing

  • $199.95 DNA testing kit (cheek swab)
  • Free shipping
  • Results available in 8-10 weeks

23andMe Review

23andMe logo

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Although 23andMe didn’t make our top three, they’re still worthy of consideration. 23andMe has been providing home DNA tests since 2007, but recently they’ve placed more of a focus on medical DNA testing. The result for DNA ancestry testing? 23andMe still conducts autosomnal DNA ancestry testing, but overall the service isn’t what it used to be for genealogists. First, 23andMe raised the price of their DNA test from $99 to $199, but the ancestry side of testing hasn’t changed. The upside? You can get medical DNA results from 23andMe, and you can’t from the other best DNA ancestry test providers we’ve reviewed here. The downsides? If you’re looking for ancestry results and related services, 23 and Me is limited compared to its competitors. Their website isn’t as user-friendly; they cap the number of matches they report to you at 1,000 (other services are unlimited). Also, matches must give prior approval to share their genomic information.

Pros

Cons

  • Large database of 1 million people
  • Test samples and results are secure for privacy
  • Provides chromosome browser to compare shared chromosomal segments
  • Provides biogeographical ancestry analysis
  • Stores your DNA sample
  • Very expensive pricing for DNA Autosomal test
  • Doesn’t offer Y-DNA or mtDNA testing
  • No genealogical DNA projects available to join on website
  • Can’t upload raw DNA data from other services
  • Genealogical community forums are lacking compared to our top two choices
  • Harder to connect with genetic matches (they must approve sharing contact information, and members say many don’t)

Pricing

  • $199.00  DNA testing kit (saliva sample)
  • Results available in 6-8 weeks

You Never Know What You’ll Discover

Watch this heartwarming story from the Katie Couric Show about what one man discovered from his AncestryDNA test.

Is Your DNA Ancestry Sample Protected?

Yes. The testing services reviewed here all have strict privacy policies in place to protect your DNA sample from being misused — you can find these policies on their websites. And in 2008, the U.S. passed the Genetic Information and Non-Discrimination Act to protect citizens from having their genetic information used against them for health insurance or employment purposes.

A Big Piece of Our Collective Human History

Whether you’re searching for living relatives or want to know where your ancestors originated from, a DNA ancestry test is a fun way to find out more about what made you who you are. With nearly three million genetic ancestry profiles conducted since genetic genealogy became commercially available in 2000 and a growing interest in DNA ancestry, we can all learn more about our shared human evolution. If you’re not already researching genealogy online, you may want to check out our Best Online Genealogy Software comparison article for our recommendations.

What do you hope to discover about your relatives and genetic makeup through DNA testing?

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About Sally Jones
An international traveler since she was under 10 years old, Sally loves exploring the world’s mysteries first hand. Her favorite destinations? Greece and the British Virgin Islands. She grew up learning to question, explore, and discover new things and ideas — it’s probably why she went into journalism as a career! She loves what the Internet has brought to research and exploration, but she still hits the ground to travel whenever she gets the chance.
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142 Comments on "Best DNA Ancestry Test 2017: 23andMe vs Ancestry vs FTDNA vs Geno 2.0"

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mario
mario

i did the test with ancestry.After 8 weeks no news, so emails and phone calls…they replied that it was “probably” lost and sent me another kit….now after 5 weeks there is no trace of this new one on the webpage where i should control the state of the process….a real mess!
and a terrible customer service ….Avoid it

Dennis
Dennis
Hi, I am quite new to this and want to know about my ancestry. I have a 97 year old aunt on my father’s side still living (father is dead) but she is in California and I may never see her. But my 83 year old mother is still alive and quite local. I looked at Family Tree DNA and they have three tests. Which of these should I take and should I give my mother one of the tests? Trying to get credible details about my past and wondering if I have to buy all the tests for myself… Read more »
Genie
Genie

Could you please evaluate a new gene analyzing program, enlis? Also, what do you think about commercial gene analyzing companies like Genomind or PGxONE Plus by Admera that need to be ordered through a psychiatrist or physician, respectively? Thanks. Great article.

Sadie Cornelius
Admin
Sadie Cornelius

Genie, thanks for sharing, we’re not familiar with the commercial companies but will look into them and consider doing an analysis in the future!

rose
rose

I have many cracks in my family tree. For example, my mother does not know who her biological father is, i don’t know anything about my biological fathers side. which is the best side to find this information out? Nationality and percentages? thank you!

wander
wander
Hi Sally. I am looking for my grandfather and his father before him, on my fathers side and are going to buy a test my brother can take to find out. What will I find out? We are Norwegians, so this is a small place on earth and I don’t know if anyone in our line has ever taken a test. Will we find out who anyone of our earlier ancestors are, or just get a confirmation that we are from the same place? (I think my grand father on my father’s side was from north and we are from… Read more »
DrRoots
DrRoots
I tried Ancestry DNA first and then Family Tree DNA. The results were almost completely off from 25%. After months of investigation I could cross-reference of Ancestry DNA, no matter how strange some “cousins” from Italy or Greece sounded like, after digging back enough in time, it made sense. I figured out that all my greek/Italian DNA really were my descendants distant cousins who left south EU (Albania/Croatia/Serbia) from Ottoman occupation. All my DNA matches in Ancestry DNA & last names matched too…. My DNA mix in Ancestry DNA was 98% European, 2% from Caucasus. “My Family Tree DNA” test… Read more »
tay
Hey Sally, I’m impressed by your fast answers to peoples questions. I am a male Jew living in Israel, my parents were born in Lithuania, I know my family has a long history in Europe, however it is also known that Jews were shifted throughout the world a lot due to the Persian and Roman Conquests around 2000 years ago, and before that its possible they were also in many parts of Africa. I’m curious to get the deepest and most accurate information possible about the history of my DNA and i’m not sure if the Ancestry DNA is better… Read more »
Rie Takashima
Rie Takashima
Hi, I just received my DNA report from the Alliance DNA and it was kind of disappointing. I am of Japanese descent (female). The report from Alliance basically showed most of my DNA is from East Asian group. Duh! I would like to go as far back as possible to find out where my ancient ancestors came from. I understand my DNA can only trace back my maternal line. In order to get the most comprehensive report of my genetic makeup, who is the best person to be tested? Both of my parents are living. I have one sister, two… Read more »
loren
loren

Hi,
Trying to figure out which dna test to have my father (88 yrs old) take. I would like as much information on ancestry and ethnicity of both his mother and father. My brother would is also interested in taking a DNA test. We are on a budget,and I would like to avoid repeating information if possible. Should my dad take Autosomal DNA, Y-DNA and mtDNA or should my brother take the mtDNA to capture my moms side of the family? or should my mom take it instead of my brother ? Im so confused : (

Steve Pritchett
Steve Pritchett

Hi, I am interested in finding out what North American Indian/Tribe background I have. I have family notes that my great, great, grandmother was a Creek Indian from Bibb County Alabama. What would be the best service to determine that.

Tks

TannerE
TannerE

Hey sally, I am trying to decide on a DNA test to determine what all is in my heritage and what in my genetics could have made me pork intolerant. My full brother couldn’t properly digest alcohol, however I don’t have that trait. I have a good idea of what parts of it may be based off what my family knows, but not entirely sure what all is there. Any Idea what I should go with?

Cassandra Valencia
Cassandra Valencia
Hello, I was curious as to what DNA test would help me now. I have gone as far as I can on both my mother’s and father’s side with both paper tail and family stories/memories. At this point, I know that my great great grandfather was supposedly born on the Apache reservation in Oklahoma in or around 1886/1889 but left to settle in Texas. There is no paperwork to support this story, but I do know historically that in 1901 the Apache, Kiowa, and Comanche lands were given up for settlement. So at this point, I am turning to DNA… Read more »
WhatAmI
WhatAmI
I am trying to find out who I am made of. My mother doesn’t know who my father and my brother’s father are. I need to find out before we’re all gone. My brother is not interested in finding his father path, but I would like to know who I may be related to, hopefully. I know there needs to be a Y somewhere for me to find him, correct? So whose test would give me the most accurate results? Would it be best for my son to be tested, since he is the closest one to me biologically. I… Read more »
TheManFromTaco
TheManFromTaco

So… after reading various comparisons online, I decided to go with 23andme, and then take the raw data file and upload it to gedmatch (the new 23andme format can’t be read by FTDNA).

The reason why I went with 23andme?
Because of all the horrible reviews lately on how inordinately long FTDNA takes to get you your results!

Frank Gilbane
Frank Gilbane

Hi Sally. I have just started on this journey to find out where my wife’s and family originate. I know I have Irish/English and USA ancestors after discussions with 2nd cousin in Boston (she is 20% North American Indian/Irish). My wife has Scots/English and we think Australian Aboriginal ancestors. She has 4 generations of family still alive in Australia. Where is the best place for testing particularly to find the Australian connection?

Lynn
Lynn

Hi Sally! I have a question- my father and I would like to get a DNA test that tells more about our ancestry. However, I have deep concerns about our information being shared with third party researchers and private companies. Am I correct in understanding that only Family Tree does not share results with third parties? And if they wish to, in the future, they will have to ask for a customer’s individual permission first? Thanks so much for clarifying this!

Mykalle
Mykalle

Hello! I have a question for you. As a woman, I’m looking to get a DNA test that will seek my deep ancient origins (2000 years ago and more). What’s better: An autosomal test with FTDNA (they have an ancient origin feature) + the FTDNA mithocondrial Full sequence OR The Genographic Project which looks like going back farther in time than the other tests? Thank you very much. Your analyse is very good.

Allan Moran
Allan Moran

Sally, I know I have a small amt of Native American blood however I do not know my ethnicity breakdown. Which DNA service would you suggest I utilize to secure ethnicity and health related information? Thanks! Allan

Neely
Neely

If my daughter’s DNA is tested to determine her heritage will it also show that info for myself and my husband?

Jo Hanna
Jo Hanna

I had two DNA tests done, one with Ancestry and one with FTDna. They turned out quite differently. Whereas, ancestry gave me 48% Italian Greek and 2% trace from Asia minor ( my father is southern Italian) FTdna gave me instead a 24% middle eastern origin including from North Africa and no mention of Italian Greek. Also Ancestry gave me Scots (British isles) and Irish ( my mom’s side) with small Scandinavian percentage- not mentioned at all in FTDna. They just said western and central European. Why the large disparity?

Hack
Hack
Did the 23andMe DNA and still cannot figure out things. My Haplogroup is K1a1b1. Long long ago I was told that we are Ashkenazi Jews but this haplogroup does not confirm this. I have family that were killed in different camps during the holocaust, they are Jewish. This DNA test has left me wondering why I even did the 23andMe. I did this so that I could know more about me and my family more, is it even worth it to go to another company. Will I waste more money by having another DNA test. My father died a few… Read more »
Randell
Randell
AncestryDNA is more likely to connect you with cousins (or distant cousins) and genealogy trees others have built. Note that haplogroup especially with dispersed and admixed groups (like jews) is not definitive as to origin, and speaks to only a single line of ancestry. Go back 10 generations, and you have ~1024 10th-great-grandfathers, and 1024 10-great-grandmothers – but only one grandfather of that group defines your haplogroup. I suspect you’d be MUCH happier with AncestryDNA, given your goals and family history. I ended up with 238 4th-cousins or closer there – and far more “probable” 4th-6th cousins. (Beyond that it’s… Read more »
bill brock
bill brock

I just want anyone that is researching family tree dna to know, it takes them 4 days to process a single kit for shipping …even though this has nothing to do with their quality (I will find this out much later…much much later). I bring this up only because if they can’t seem to process an order any faster than that, what is the chance that they mess up your dna sample, or confuse it with someone else, or forget to do it all together. Take this into consideration when deciding which company to use.

Jacqueline
Jacqueline
Hi Bill Brock. Ancestry dot com processed my order immediately but took many weeks to process the sample. Just thought people ought to know that I would rather a company take its time and do a great job than rush and get it wrong. Look at what each company offers. I am disappointed in Ancestry dot com. Only one good match and that person wont answer my message. Guess I am not the right color. So take time when deciding which company to choose. I went with Ancestry because they were having a Black Friday Special – wrong reason. I… Read more »
Laura
Laura
Great article! Wish I’d seen this before I started purchasing DNA kits for myself and my family. Currently my father and I are both in the 23AndMe database. My uncle in Italy is quite interested in doing the test so I’ve been trying to find the best way to get the 23AndMe kit to him in the small town that he lives in. Do you know if these tests are offered in Europe? I first tried to purchase the kit directly through 23AndMe but wasn’t able to get it sent to my uncle’s address. So I called 23AndMe about it… Read more »
Hoss
Hoss
First tested with Ancestry.com, best site for beginners. You can research and build your family tree with related civil records, and other trees. You then can link your DNA kit to your family tree. This allows Ancestry to correlate other clients DNA / tree matches, shared matches and geographical maps. Best of all you can shut off your paid-membership after a month and start it up again at a later date. Ancestry left me with further questions to regions I had no knowledge of, so I uploaded to GEDMATCH (free) and paid for a transfer fee of $30 dollars to… Read more »
Sadie Cornelius
Admin
Sadie Cornelius

Hoss thanks for sharing your experience with us!

HCS

I want to confirm the genealogy that has been passed down by my family and also understand if I have propensity for certain diseases. Would the 23 and Me or Family Tree be better? If I have my daughter tested instead would that confirm my ancestry as well as that from her father? Thank you.

Wil V
Wil V

What advantage do I have if I purchase the y-111 through FTDNA as oppose to y-67 or y-37?

Dee

Which DNA company is the best at finding detail geographical regions of my ancestors and possible famous relatives?

David
David

Dear Sally, my wife was born from an out-of-marriage union. She knows absolutely nothing about her father. She’d like to know what genetic predispositions and tendencies he left her. Most important for her are medical, mental, and other related tendencies. Her mother had a stroke at 55 and my wife is now 53. The stroke left her mother in a nonverbal state, so she cannot get any information there. My wife is not trying to find her father, only to understand what genetic input he left her. Recommendations?

Evey Mae
Evey Mae

I am interested in getting as much information as possible but it is also very important that I can use this to connect to a family tree as this will also be used for family tree genealogy projects. I do have an ancestry account as well but which company should I use to get detailed genetic information and the ability to add info to ancestry?

Hplo
Hplo
How much would you recommend just WAITING a few years to have these tests done? It sounds like they are constantly improving, their databases are getting larger and larger, and they are probably decreasing in cost. The technology can only improve over time, as the databases fill with more people and the discoveries become greater. What is the likelihood that these tests which cost $199 now might cost $20 with better results in ten years or so? If they are likely to improve a lot and cost less, I think the best option is to wait, since none of these… Read more »
Jacqueline
Jacqueline

Hi Hplo. Love the screen name. I am old now. I did all that waiting and its true the prices have dropped a LOT since the OJ Simpson trial. What has also happened is that my elders are dying. I wish I had done the right thing and had them tested. Now they are dead. I have a hair brush from my mother but no company that offers hair follicle testing to the public.

Amalee
Amalee
I’m sorry if my questions have been asked before, but I’ve been doing research for this and its all a little overwhelming. I’ve got two questions: (1) Aside from 23&Me, which other service provides health information along with family/ethnic information? (2) Do these companies really work with the pharmaceutical and insurance industries (to study our results)? (Apparently through some loophole in GINA.) Also, is these an opt out option to allowing these companies access to our information? It’s something I heard, but I can only verify to a degree. I want to know 100%. Although I love the idea of… Read more »
Lmt Lmt
Lmt Lmt

From the information given here, it looks like I can’t, even with my brother’s saliva, get information from my father’s side of the family. Is that correct?

future2
future2

My 15 year old Cambodia adopted daughter is interested to learn more about her ethnicity, which test would you recommend?
Thank you, in advance.

Joseph Arnold
Joseph Arnold

Hi Sally. I’m trying to figure out what nationality my father’s side is. I never met him and don’t know much about him could you help direct me to what type of test I should get and from what company.

Albert
Albert
Hello Sally, I am still a little bit confused on which company to choose. Could you give me your opinion? I am a male interested on knowing my Genetic background from both my dad and my mum lineage since they are from different places but they are both western European. I would like a test that told me how much % of my DNA comes from the different places of Europe (like for example 30% Scandinavian, 40% British… or something like this) I would be very frustrated if the test only said “Western European” or something like this. What would… Read more »
Tracee Clay
Tracee Clay
I’m thinking of the 23andme, but I am not sure if this test could show that I have relatives living in France or near France. While my grandfather was in Europe (WWII vet) he fathered a child(ren) with a French woman. My mother and her siblings heard their grandmother mention that there was a letter asking them to fly the child(ren) to the U.S. but the children were never flown here. So, now that my grandfather is deceased, would there be anyway to find out who they are if they’re still living or if they have children is there a… Read more »
ashton ashton
ashton ashton

23andme is the most accurate. Family tree dna no.

ashton ashton
ashton ashton

I used ancestry dna family tree and 23andme and 23andme was by far the most accurate. Ancestry 2nd. Family Tree was a complete joke no where near.

Tracee Clay
Tracee Clay

23 and me states, “Some genetic ancestry services only provide autosomal DNA analysis or charge you separately for the maternal and paternal haplogroup information. 23andMe includes all of these for a single price. I might go with this one instead.

Sadie Cornelius
Admin
Sadie Cornelius

Tracee, thanks for sharing and please let us know how it goes!

Amanda Evans
Amanda Evans

I am interested mostly in finding out what my parents genetic backgrounds are. If I use my brother’s DNA sample, will I be able to see what my results from both my mother and father are? From the research I have done, 23andMe shows the maternal and paternal halpogroups. Will the halpogroups show the genetic and cultural background?

Kpsych
Kpsych

My 3 grown children are all very interested in this process. I am considering ordering the kits for Christmas. Do full siblings get almost identical results? Would 23&me be the best choice because it will give individualized medical data as well as (probably) similar ancestry data? Thanks!

GigiHawaii
GigiHawaii

I am considering having my 2 adopted siblings DNA analyzed for their personal information. They have recently found their mother and other siblings but there still is a lot of mystery about their full ethnicity. I want to use a site that is certifiable so if they need to verify their ethnicity for any legal reasons that the test results will be valid. Which one would suffice that?

ekw
One thing to note about uploading DNA results to Family Tree DNA is that they currently don’t accept AncestryDNA 2.0 test results. I had my DNA tested through Ancestry since I’m already a member and I figured if I had the test done with them (while they were running a $79 special and using a free shipping promo code) I could reap the benefits of both Ancestry and Family Tree DNA (by uploading my raw autosomal data). I got my Ancestry DNA results in June 2016 (one month and two days after they received my sample) and immediately went to… Read more »
Sadie Cornelius
Admin
Sadie Cornelius

Thanks for sharing your experience and good to know about Gedmatch too! We will check them out and consider adding them in our next update of this article. Thanks again for reading and giving your first-hand experience with DNA testing!

Mana Capo
Mana Capo

Why when it comes to DNA test and you have some degree of native American, they circle the whole American continent as if it were a single genetic compound, when in reality there is a big genetic difference lets say between an Aztec than a Maya (nose, face, body etc) or an Apache from an Inca or Skimo and a Comanche, when in Europe (a smaller territory than the Americas) there is a big difference lets say between an Iberian than from an Italian and a Greek, which are very close from each other.

James Wolfe
James Wolfe
Hummm, I am curious about ancestry. After all, have done the other sites, as been of majority British / European ancestry they’re utterly useless except to identify a handful of colonist relatives. Supposedly it has a large UK database, however, as someone who knows more than breadcrumbs about the family history I am wary. After all, there are countless “trees” on that site in which accuracy is nothing more than a pipe dream. Even “trees” that have been proven inaccurate by outside research [such as the popular Acadian families] are still lauded on ancestry as been accurate. Nor will I… Read more »
Rui Rocha
Rui Rocha

Hi Sally, I am Portuguese and I am supposed to have a British ancestor as my grandfather used to say so. My British ancestor would be a my great great grandfather. As he didn’t marry my great great grandmother he appears as unknown. I would like to do a DNA test to find out if I have a strong percentage from the UK/Ireland. In addition, I would like to find some close relatives (up to ten generations). Which one you think is more suitable for me?

Many thanks
Rui

James Wolfe
James Wolfe

Well for one DNA testing DOES NOT cover to ten generations. Shows the legitimacy of this author when she doesn’t even cover that little piece of information. You may get 6 generations, if lucky, however, past four generations [so great-great grandparents] the relationship accuracy rapidly decreases. That’s of course not counting the fact DNA only identifies what sections you and the relative shares, therefore, you get half the picture. If you have siblings testing them too would assist.

Christopher Poole
Christopher Poole
Mr. Wolfe, you are mistaken on nearly every single point you made in this comment and a couple others I see with your name on them. When you purchase something like the Ancestry membership, or service, it tells you that you must check for accuracy and do research yourself, which is very easy. You sound like one of the people who purchased access to the data willy-nilly, without understanding how it works, then started complaining within 24-48 hrs that you didn’t know everything you wanted to know about your family tree. You weren’t buying a full family tree. If you… Read more »
Mr Neutron
Mr Neutron

One ought to be very, very wary of these tests, particularly 23andme, after reading this:

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/23andme-is-terrifying-but-not-for-the-reasons-the-fda-thinks/

I’ll pass, thanks.

Hiroku
Hiroku

Thanks for the deceptive review om Family Tree DNA!
The customer service is slow as molasses almost to the point of non-existence. The service is absolutely ridiculous, they do not give you your origins but rather a match up with one of their other clients in the DNA database. Unless you are an orphan or adopted this service is utterly useless – even if you are their database is so small that your odds of finding a relative is marginal at best.

Judi DeQuaker
Judi DeQuaker

Thank you for sharing that! Does anyone have a what is best test recommendation? Looking for full genetic nationality including American Indian.

Hiroku
Hiroku

I had a good experience with 23andme. It is $99 if you only want ancestry and $199 (I think) if you want both medical and DNA. If you buy it through Amazon you can save the shipping fee.

Sadie Cornelius
Admin
Sadie Cornelius

Hiroku, thanks for letting us know we updated and included a link to Amazon the review above!

Sadie Cornelius
Admin
Sadie Cornelius

Hiroku, sorry to hear you had a bad experience with Family Tree DNA, that’s definitely good to know and appreciate the feedback for our readers. We will definitely take that into consideration as we update our article in the future too. Thanks for reading and sharing!

Hiroku
Hiroku

Unfortunately, I only looked on Yelp after the purchase – but it reflects my sentiments.

John Keller
John Keller

23andMe is hands down the best. But higher cost for higher quality.

Sadie Cornelius
Admin
Sadie Cornelius

John, thanks for sharing your experience! Agreed, sometimes you pay for what you get so sometimes the higher price is worth it!

Heather
Heather
Ancestry.com is 6-8 weeks from the time the lab receives your DNA, not when they actually received your DNA back in the mail. When they receive it back it still has to transfer it to the lab so total time is about 9-11 weeks. If your lucky. In my experience, I followed the instructions on the package and 2 weeks after my DNA was in the lab was told they could not read it and would send me a new kit (that would take 10 days). Then I have to send it back and go through the whole waiting period… Read more »
Millie
Millie

O wow! My husband and I just got our results in. Took only a month. From the time we ordered till we got our results. Waiting that long would have drove me crazy!

Sadie Cornelius
Admin
Sadie Cornelius

Heather, wow that’s a long process and I’m sure you are anxious to know the results! Thanks for sharing your experience with us and our readers.

Heather
Heather

Sadie, your welcome. I’m happy to share my experience. I have to honestly say that I have truly lost interest in the process. My mom has done our genealogy, I was curious to know my percentages, but not enough to go through what they have put me through. It’s another company that has lost the knack of good customer service this day and age.

SeattleCobra
SeattleCobra

Ancestry.com is owned by the Mormon Church. Minus one for that. I’m not giving my money or DNA results to a right wing religious fanatical group that believes in crazy stuff like the Planet Kolob. The only reason they’re so good at it is the fact they’ve been marrying their first cousins repeatedly for over two hundred years.

SeattleCobra
SeattleCobra

Huh… well I did not know that. Thanks for correcting me. I thought FamilySearch owned Ancestry.

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