Trick or Treat: The True Origin of Halloween

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Kids in halloween costumesThe yearly holiday of Halloween is one of the most anticipated holidays of the year for children worldwide; however, this candy filled holiday was not always the holiday it is today. It was not always that children dressed like demons and posed the well-known question “trick or treat”, it was not always that houses displayed decorations and families came together to walk through neighborhoods. The holiday we know as Halloween today did not begin with any of the commonly known traditions of today’s celebrations, in fact the holiday had much more peculiar and mixed beginnings.

The Origin of Halloween

The actual origin of Halloween has been argued by various historians with some who believe that Halloween found its roots in the Roman Pomona feasts that celebrated the Roman goddess of fruit and seeds and some believe that Halloween found its roots in Parentalia, the festival of the dead. While these two festivals seem to give something to the story of Halloween; however, it is the belief of the majority that the holiday of Halloween actually derives from Samhain, the Celtic festival which celebrates the end of the summer and the beginning of the darker days of the year. The superstitious Celts believed that during the latter half of the year as the days became darker much more quickly that the boundary between the other world and ours became so thin that spirits were able to move through to our world and cause havoc.

The Celtic Festival of Samhain

Zombie behind tombstone on HalloweenDuring the Celtic festival of Samhain people would dress in costume in an attempt to scare away the evil spirits. During this time when spirits were believed to pass between worlds families would invite their ancestors in to their homes but do everything they could to ward off the more harmful spirits including wearing the costumes mentioned above as well as masks.

Also utilized to scare away the harmful spirits of Samhain were large turnips, which were carved much like today’s Halloween pumpkins. These jack-o-lantern turnips would be placed in the windows of homes in an attempt to frighten away any evil spirits. It was the belief of the Celts that if they or their turnips resembled scary spirits then the spirits that crossed from the other world would avoid them and their homes in the belief that they had already been tagged by a spirit.

When is Halloween Celebrated?

The actual celebration of Halloween occurs every year on October 31st, also referred to as All Hallows Eve. In many religious sects the day following all hallows eve, All Saints Day, is a day dedicated to the celebration of all of the saints both known and unknown. A few days following All Saints Day comes All Soul’s Day, a day dedicated to all the souls of those who believed who have now departed.

Where Does the Name Halloween Come From?

All Hallows Eve is actually the base of the origin of the name “Halloween” after the more commonly used phrase “All Hallows Eve” became “All Hallows Even” and then later it was shortened to Halloween in the 16th century. Throughout the years this holiday known as Halloween came to be something of a melting pot of ideas contributed by various cultures and belief systems. Europeans came together and meshed Celtic ideas, Catholic ideas and the Roman religious rituals in to one day of celebration that fell around the time that the Celtic tradition of Samhain fell, the turning of the seasons when the world became a darker place by virtue of the sun’s position in the sky. Combining the Celtic idea of Samhain, the Catholic beliefs of All Saints Eve and All Souls Day, and the traditional Roman celebration of Parentalia created the holiday we now know as Halloween.

Cultural Halloween Traditions

While these days the celebration of Halloween has become much more commercialized many of the traditions that remain today hail from older cultural traditions. While commonly today individuals do not necessarily understand the reason for certain Halloween traditions, their roots almost always return to the mesh of cultural t

About The Author:

Amy grew up in England and in the early 1990's moved to North Carolina where she completed a bachelors degree in Psychology in 2001. Amy's personal interest in writing was sparked by her love of reading fiction and her creative writing hobby. Amy is currently self employed as a freelance writer and web designer. When she is not working Amy can be found curled up with a good book and her black Labrador, Jet.

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